Alkaline Diet Recipe #95: Alkaline Curry Lentil Stew

Alkaline Lentil StewIn these cold and dark winter days this alkaline curry lentil stew will fill and warm you up nicely and provide you with all the proteins your body needs.

This stew has got an abundance of different flavours given by a variety of oriental spices like kurkuma, ginger, chilli paste, curry and cumin. The main ingredient are lentils, which are a type of pulse and belong to the legume family. They are widely used throughout India, Pakistan, the Mediterranean and the Middle East.

Lentils contain very high levels of protein, which makes them a great protein source on a vegetarian diet. They also contain folate, Vitamin B, dietary fiber and minerals and are the best vegetable source for iron. They are hence very useful in preventing an iron deficiency.

Other vegetables in this stew are onions, leeks and carrots, which are all alkalising and packed with nutrients.

I hope you enjoy this winter warming alkaline curry lentil stew!

Alkaline Curry Lentil Stew

Serves 4

Ingredients

1 big carrot, finely grated
1 red onion, finely cut
1 leek, cut into fine rings
2 garlic cloves, finely cut
1/2 tsp fresh ginger, grated
1/2 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp chilli paste or fresh chilli
1/2 tsp kurkuma
1 tsp curry powder
2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
250g lentils, red or yellow
1.2 litres of water
Freshly ground black pepper
Himalayan Crystal Salt or Celtic Rock Sea Salt

Instructions

Gently heat the olive oil in a large pot. Add the onions and steam fry them whilst stirring for about 4 to 5 minutes. Add the garlic, carrot and leek and steam fry for a further 2 minutes. Stir in the kurkuma, chilli paste, curry powder, cumin and ingwer. Add the water and stir all the ingredients well.

Clean the lentils under running water and drain them well. Add them to the pot and let them boil up shortly. Reduce the heat, put the lid on and let the stew cook on a low temperature for about 35 minutes, until the vegetables have started to soften. Stir regularly.

Let the stew cool down slightly and puree everything with an immersion blender. Gently heat the stew again and season to taste with pepper and salt.

Enjoy!

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  1. Pingback: The 4 Biggest Mistakes Most Alkaline Beginners Make (…and how to turn them into strengths!) - Live Energized

  2. Maxine ball Reply

    Hi Ross , does the alkaline diet help with. Lupus?

  3. Pingback: The 4 Biggest Mistakes Most Alkaline Beginners Make (…and how to turn them into strengths!)

  4. grace Reply

    Hi, thanks for all your information. I find it hard at times cause I dont know which are the good acidic foods to add with alkaline foods. Pls can you help. All the best and many thanks

  5. Ross Reply

    Hi Chris,

    here are some answers:

    1. Tumeric is another word for kurkuma.
    2. Ginger is the English word for ingwer. I am actually German and must have randomly used the German word for it :0).
    3. Just gently fry the onions in the oil for a few minutes, then add the vegetables and lastly the spices. You then add the water to the pot.

    I hope this info has clarified things, but if not please let us know.

    Regards

    Bibi

    • Chris Reply

      Thanks Bibi,

      I just thought it was a typo anagram thing – I find one language hard enough.

      Thanks for the clarification. Great to have the interaction.

      Any feedback on Lucy’s question above:
      “Lucy Raeside November 24, 2010 at 5:17 pm
      Sorry! Confusion again. I thought it wasn’t good to heat oil, but to put it in afterwards? Also thought cooking vegetables as long as 35 minutes took all the utrients from vegetables.
      So its okay to eat lentils unsprouted? I thought that would present a mineral absorption problem? Help me figure this out! Please!”

      My very basic thoughts would be:
      use coconut oil (which is less damaged by heat – don’t know about the alkalinity).
      Veg wise the veg is cooked in the dish so though the cooking time is long all the soluable nutrients are retained within the dish – the water is not discarded – not sure about what might actually broken down by the heat.
      I guess raw and sprouted dishes are a different more purist approach – this is a great alternative to a meat and fat laden traditional alternative.

      hope that helps – any clarification or correctiongs welcome

      Chris

  6. Chris Reply

    Hi Ross,

    Thanks for all the great info just 3 little points of clarification.

    1. – kurkuma = tumeric?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turmeric
    from Arabic ???? (kúrkum, “turmeric”)

    2. – And “Stir in the kurkuma, chilli paste, curry powder, cumin and ingwer.” ingwer = ginger?

    3. – Steam fry are you sautéing or steam frying? “2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil”
    Can you clarify the amount of liquid added and when?

    “steam frying” – that is, sautéing food briefly in a little oil, then adding water, stock or wine and covering the pan.

    Cheers Chris (UK)

  7. Lucy Raeside Reply

    Sorry! Confusion again. I thought it wasn’t good to heat oil, but to put it in afterwards? Also thought cooking vegetables as long as 35 minutes took all the utrients from vegetables.
    So its okay to eat lentils unsprouted? I thought that would present a mineral absorption problem? Help me figure this out! Please!

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