Alkaline Recipe #138: Soba Pasta Pesto Pine Extravaganza!

Article by ross

I’m a big fan of the soba noodle. They’re not super-alkaline, but to have as part of your 20% acid-forming foods on your plate these are SO much better than straight pasta.

Firstly, they’re not made from durum wheat (like normal high-GI pasta) they’re made from buckwheat, which is far closer to the neutral end of the acid/alkaline scale.

Because of this they’re low GI, high in protein and high in fibre, making you feel satiated for longer and less likely to snack.

Combined with fresh, raw pesto, uncooked oil and pine nuts, this meal is a great transition recipe.

Soba, Pesto, Pine Nut Extravaganza!

Serves 2

Ingredients

1 pack of soba noodles (depending on pack size, make the noodles just 20% of your plate)
250g pine nuts (pref organic)
1 cup of cold-pressed olive oil, flax oil or Udo’s Choice
1 bunch of basil, plus parsley and coriander to taste
Himalayan Crystal Salt
Freshly ground pepper

Optional: extra veggies, steamed such as zucchini, broccoli, tomato (raw), rocket, peas etc…or serve with a big side salad of rocket.

Other optional: you can also include some semi-dried tomatoes in the pesto to mix things up!

Instructions

Cook the soba noodles as per instructions on the packet. Remember to keep the noodles to 20% of the plate.

Give the herbs a good wash (basil, coriander and parsley) and blend these up with the pine nuts and a tiny amount of oil to get it going. Once these are blended, toss in the rest of the ingredients and blend until you get a creamy sauce.

At this stage if you’re going to have with other veggies or a salad, prepare this now.

Once the veggies are ready and the noodles are cooked, I like to toss together with the pesto in a saucepan to warm gently. Season with salt and pepper and you’re ready to go!

 

 

Soba Pasta Pesto Pine Extravaganza!
Serves 2
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Ingredients
  1. 1 pack of soba noodles (depending on pack size, make the noodles just 20% of your plate)
  2. 250g pine nuts (pref organic)
  3. 1 cup of cold-pressed olive oil, flax oil or Udo's Choice
  4. 1 bunch of basil, plus parsley and coriander to taste
  5. Himalayan Crystal Salt
  6. Freshly ground pepper
  7. Optional: extra veggies, steamed such as zucchini, broccoli, tomato (raw), rocket, peas etc...or serve with a big side salad of rocket.
  8. Other optional: you can also include some semi-dried tomatoes in the pesto to mix things up!
Instructions
  1. Cook the soba noodles as per instructions on the packet. Remember to keep the noodles to 20% of the plate.
  2. Give the herbs a good wash (basil, coriander and parsley) and blend these up with the pine nuts and a tiny amount of oil to get it going. Once these are blended, toss in the rest of the ingredients and blend until you get a creamy sauce.
  3. At this stage if you're going to have with other veggies or a salad, prepare this now.
  4. Once the veggies are ready and the noodles are cooked, I like to toss together with the pesto in a saucepan to warm gently. Season with salt and pepper and you're ready to go!
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  1. Amanda Reply

    I love the taste of this pesto :0) I didn’t have enough pine nuts so wizzed up some organic cashew nuts as well ~ lovely jubley!

  2. em Reply

    ross please answer my question ? It’s very important for me

  3. Teree Thomson Reply

    Hi Ross

    I have been looking at your acid/alkaline food chart 3 and 4, and you mention how other similar charts are based on the ash residue of food after it has been burnt.
    I agree with you that this may not be entirely accurate but I am curious as to how you obtain the info for your charts, which you say is based on the research of Dr Robert Young.
    I just want to make sure it is right but cannot seem to find anything related to it, all info is just based on the ash residue. I would really appreciate it if you could tell me as it is hard to commit yourself to something with so much conflicting advice.

    thanx for your time

    Teree

  4. Debbie Reply

    Is there a “printable version” of the above recipie?

  5. Tonia Reply

    Hi there,
    Where do I find soba Noodles ??

    Tonia

  6. Deepa Reply

    what is the solution for canker sore?

  7. Gillian Reply

    Ross, can you cook with flaxseed oil or is it not made dangerous when heated.??

  8. Miriam Reply

    I made it and it was very good; I made it again but had no soba
    and am trying to be gluten free, so I used spahetti squash for the pasta – fabulous!, and that eliminated the wheat; and since I eat by colors I added raw spinach into the mix just before serving, not cooked, just wilted. (My pesto was from Whole Foods; I’ve never made pesto myself but I will next time.) I added tomato for more color, and some cilantro into the herb mix. I already knew about buckwheat; it’s actually not wheat at all. I once looked for buckwheat pancake mix at Whole Foods but they all had wheat added in, because they apparently think that makes it taste better. I think if they simply added more liquid, eggs, etc., it would be a better texture without the wheat flour.

  9. em Reply

    I loved the recipe. I was surprised to see that buckwheat noodles are not 100% alkaline though! why is that? isn’t buckwheat itself alkaline? I use noodles that only use 100% buckwheat, sea salt and water and are slow dried :S Now I wonder if quinoa and quinoa flour are neutral/mildly acidic instead of alkaline too :S I really hope you answer this one for me….pleeeeaseeeeeee???

  10. frankie Reply

    Thank you

  11. madhu Reply

    i like it the taste is very good and it is alkaline

  12. Alexis Reply

    I made this last night and I LOVED it! Just one question that came up while shopping for soba noodles. Most of them contain primarily wheat flour, then buckwheat flour, and salt. Is this what you use? Is this still an alkaline food with the wheat?

    I did manage to find one package that contains 100% buckwheat, but I had a feeling the regular/traditional mix of wheat and buckwheat would taste better, so I bought the traditional type…

  13. Michelle Reply

    This was the first recipe that I tried from the site, and it was absolutely delicious! I already have plans to make it again.

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